For Quick Alerts
ALLOW NOTIFICATIONS  
For Daily Alerts

World Osteoporosis Day: Role Of Nutrition In Osteoporosis Prevention; A 7-Day Osteoporosis Diet Plan

| Reviewed By Dr. Arya Krishnan

World Osteoporosis Day is observed on 20 October, every year. The day is observed during the Bone and Joint Action Week, which also includes World Arthritis Day, World Spine Day, World Trauma Day and World Pediatric Bone and Joint Day.

The day is observed to raise global awareness of the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. The day is organised by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF).

Launched in 1996, World Osteoporosis Day was commemorated by the United Kingdom's National Osteoporosis Society and supported by the European Commission. From the year 1999, the day has a specific theme with the theme for the year 2018 calling for global action to improve bone health and prevent fractures caused by osteoporosis. The theme for 2019 has not been issued.

On this World Osteoporosis Day, let us take a look ways foods can have an impact on the condition.

Osteoporosis And Nutrition

A condition that causes the easy breaking of bones, osteoporosis is the most common reason for a broken bone among the elderly. The condition causes the bones to become brittle, thereby increasing its chances of breaking. Osteoporosis can be prevented and, a proper diet is a right answer to it.

Following a proper and healthy diet comprised of calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, potassium and vitamin C help avoid the onset of osteoporosis and prevent broken bones. Apart from proper exercise, a good diet is the most effective way to limit the onset of the condition [1] .

According to studies, olive oil, soybeans, blueberries and foods rich in omega-3s, like fish oil and flaxseed oil can boost your bone health [2] . Maintaining good overall health is essential for your body and mind.

In that case, let us take a look at the types of food to eat and avoid to prevent the onset of osteoporosis.

Foods To Eat

  • Vegetables such as collard greens, turnip greens, kale, okra, Chinese cabbage, dandelion greens, mustard greens and broccoli are rich in calcium - a good means to prevent the onset. [3]
  • Potassium-rich foods such as tomato products, raisins, potatoes, spinach, sweet potatoes, papaya, oranges, orange juice, bananas, plantains and prunes.
  • Vitamin K-rich dark green leafy vegetables such as kale, collard greens, spinach, mustard greens, turnip greens and Brussels sprouts [4] .
  • Vitamin C-rich red peppers, green peppers, oranges, grapefruit, broccoli, strawberries, brussels sprouts, papaya and pineapples.
  • Magnesium-rich foods such as spinach, okra, tomato products, artichokes, plantains, potatoes, sweet potatoes, collard greens and raisins [5] .

Foods To Avoid

  • Alcohol, as it can lead to bone loss.
  • Coffee, tea and soft drinks which contain caffeine can decrease calcium absorption and contribute to bone loss.
  • Drinking more than three cups of coffee every day may interfere with calcium absorption and cause bone loss [6] .
  • Salty foods such as chips, processed meats, fast foods (pizza, burger), processed foods, canned food item and baked products that have a high salt level can cause bone weakness and contribute towards osteoporosis. Hence, control your sodium intake [7] .
  • Limit your consumption of soy products (edamame, tofu, tempeh, and soy beverages) as the plant compounds in it can hamper calcium absorption.

7-Day Osteoporosis Diet Plan

Now that we have gone through the list of foods to eat and avoid for the prevention of osteoporosis, let us take a look at the nutrition and diet for individuals who are already suffering from osteoporosis. When you have osteoporosis, your body must be supplied with nutrients to make your bones as strong as possible [8] [9] .

Here is a 7-day meal plan for individuals with osteoporosis, which can help improve the condition and prevent further worsening [10] .

Sunday

  • Breakfast: 1 cup orange juice, 1 cup whole-grain cereal in ½ cup skim milk
  • Lunch: 2 toasted cheese and ham sandwiches with a cup of orange juice/green salad with 1 hard-boiled egg and 1 cup milk
  • Snack: 1 orange
  • Dinner: Small meat cubes mixed with large spinach with brown rice

Monday

  • Breakfast: 2 eggs poached in water with 2 pieces of wholegrain toast and 1 cup skim milk/1 slice whole-grain toast with peanut butter, avocado, or fruit jam
  • Lunch: Boiled vegetables with a green salad and 1 cup juice/3 white fish cakes with collard green salad
  • Snack: Banana milkshake
  • Dinner: Cucumber, avocado, and tomato salad with grilled chicken/Whole grain pasta with a green salad

Tuesday

  • Breakfast: Slow-cooked oatmeal prepared with apples and/or raisins with 1 cup orange juice
  • Lunch: Falafel sandwich with 1 slice watermelon
  • Snack: 1 apple, banana, or orange, or 1 serving strawberries
  • Dinner: Mashed sweet potato with boiled corn/1 bowl of stir fry, containing chicken slices, broccoli, carrots, corn and noodles

Wednesday

  • Breakfast: Scrambled eggs with vegetables, such as bell peppers, sugar snap peas, and spinach
  • Lunch: Whole-wheat wrap with red pepper hummus, grated carrots, and tomato (you can add pieces of chicken too)
  • Snack: Fruit smoothie blended with low-fat yoghurt or skim milk
  • Dinner: Grilled chicken sautéed with zucchini, asparagus, and mushrooms/Corn on the cob

Thursday

  • Breakfast: Whole-grain cereal with sliced strawberries, ½ cup soy milk and 1 small banana
  • Lunch: Green salad with tomatoes and basil/Thai soup with noodles, spinach, mushrooms, and corn
  • Snack: Orange slices
  • Dinner: Whole-grain spaghetti with vegetables, such as chopped onions, grated carrots, and diced broccoli (you can add chicken too) with 1 cup orange juice

Friday

  • Breakfast: Whole-grain pancakes topped with apple sauce or fruit spread and 1 cup orange juice
  • Lunch: Vegetable and/or bean-based soup with 1 apple, banana, or orange
  • Snack: Whole-grain crackers or crisps
  • Dinner: Whole-wheat spinach lasagna with low-fat cheese with a green salad, with vegetables of your choice

Saturday

  • Breakfast: Omelet or quiche with tomato, spinach, and other desired vegetables with 1 cup skim milk
  • Lunch: Mashed potatoes with boiled salmon/Whole-grain bun with boiled vegetables
  • Snack: 1 handful of unsalted almonds
  • Dinner: Greek salad with feta cheese/Nachos topped with kidney beans, avocado, and low-fat cheese
View Article References
  1. [1] Muhammad, A., Mada, S. B., Malami, I., Forcados, G. E., Erukainure, O. L., Sani, H., & Abubakar, I. B. (2018). Postmenopausal osteoporosis and breast cancer: The biochemical links and beneficial effects of functional foods. Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, 107, 571-582.
  2. [2] Kelly, L., & Kelly, H. B. (2016). The Healthy Bones Nutrition Plan and Cookbook: How to Prepare and Combine Whole Foods to Prevent and Treat Osteoporosis Naturally. Chelsea Green Publishing.
  3. [3] Rozenberg, S., Body, J. J., Bruyere, O., Bergmann, P., Brandi, M. L., Cooper, C., ... & Rizzoli, R. (2016). Effects of dairy products consumption on health: benefits and beliefs—a commentary from the Belgian Bone Club and the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases. Calcified Tissue International, 98(1), 1-17.
  4. [4] Crosby, A. (2019). Nonpharmacologic Interventions and Lifestyle Modifications Resulting in Prevention and Reduction of Osteoporosis.
  5. [5] Liu, Z. H., Tang, Z. H., Zhang, K. Q., & Shi, L. (2016). Salty food preference is associated with osteoporosis among Chinese men. Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, 25(4), 871.
  6. [6] Misner, S., & Farrell, V. A. (2017). Osteoporosis.
  7. [7] Reid, I. R., & Bristow, S. M. (2016). Calcium fortified foods or supplements for older people?. Maturitas, 85, 1-4.
  8. [8] Ishimi, Y. (2015). Osteoporosis and lifestyle. Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology, 61(Supplement), S139-S141.
  9. [9] Kartikey, K., Singh, G., Sah, D., Singh, R. B., Singh, A. K., Takahashi, T., & Wilczynska, A. (2019). Functional Food Security for Osteoporosis, Carcinogenesis, Atherosclerosis and Brain Degeneration. In The Role of Functional Food Security in Global Health (pp. 639-651). Academic Press.
  10. [10] De França, N. A. G., Camargo, M. B. R., Lazaretti-Castro, M., Peters, B. S. E., & Martini, L. A. (2016). Dietary patterns and bone mineral density in Brazilian postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: a cross-sectional study. European journal of clinical nutrition, 70(1), 85.
Arya KrishnanGeneral Medicine
MBBS
Arya Krishnan

Read more about: osteoporosis bone health
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. This includes cookies from third party social media websites and ad networks. Such third party cookies may track your use on Boldsky sites for better rendering. Our partners use cookies to ensure we show you advertising that is relevant to you. If you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on Boldsky website. However, you can change your cookie settings at any time. Learn more