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    Home-made Fruit Face Packs For Oily Skin

    Oily skin comes with its own set of problems. Be it acne, pimples, blackheads, clogged pores or greasiness, you've to tackle it all. Our skin secretes a natural oil called sebum. It helps to moisturise and protect our skin. However, when produced in excess it leads to oily skin, which then leads to all the issues mentioned above.

    Oily skin or rather excess sebum production can be attributed to factors such as genetics, hormonal imbalance, stress, weather, medication and not taking proper care of your skin. Hence, it is a tricky job to handle oily skin.

    Home-made Fruit Face Packs For Oily Skin

    You might have tried many products available in the market for oily skin. But these provide only a temporary solution. So what can you do now? Is there any way to tackle this issue? If you are looking for answers to these questions, we have them here for you.

    You must already have guessed it from the title. Yes, it is fruits. Fruits are a great natural remedy that can help with oily skin. They are not only delicious but also contain various vitamins and minerals that can work wonders while dealing with oily skin. So today we bring to you the fruits that can help with oily skin and instructions on how to use them. Read on and find out!

    1. Banana

    Banana is enriched with vitamins A, B6, C and E, zinc, potassium and amino acids. [1] , [2] It thus helps to fight free radical damage, prevent acne, protect skin from sun damage and nourish the skin.

    Oats have mild cleansing properties due to the presence of saponin [3] , a cleaning agent. Saponin helps to remove dirt from the skin pores. It exfoliates and moisturises the skin. Oats also contain antioxidants [4] that prevent skin from pollution and sun damage.

    Honey has anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties [5] that help to soothe the skin and keep it healthy. It moisturises the skin without making it oily and helps to treat acne.

    Ingredients

    • ½ ripe banana
    • 1 tsp raw honey
    • 2 tbsp oats

    Method of use

    • Mash the banana in a bowl.
    • Add honey and oats to the bowl and give it a good mix.
    • Now gently massage your face with this mixture in a circular motion for a few minutes.
    • Leave it on for 1 hour.
    • Rinse it off with warm water.
    • Pat your face dry.

    2. Strawberry

    Strawberry contains vitamin C [6] which helps to fight free radical damage and treat acne. It has alpha hydroxy acid, salicylic acid [7] , and folate [8] . The presence of these compounds make strawberry a great fruit to fight acne, blemishes, dark spots and control excess oil, thus treating oily skin and related issues.

    Yogurt contains lactic acid that helps to exfoliate and moisturise the skin. [9] It contains antioxidants that help to fight free radical damage and help reduce fine lines and wrinkles.

    Ingredients

    • 2-3 strawberries
    • 1 tbsp yogurt

    Method of use

    • Mash the strawberries in a bowl.
    • Add the yogurt to the bowl and mix well.
    • Gently massage the mixture into your face for a few minutes, using a scrub pad.
    • Leave it on for 10 minutes.
    • Rinse it off with water.

    3. Orange

    Orange contains antioxidants [10] that help to fight free radical damage. It contains citric acid [11] that helps to fight acne and pimples. Orange also moisturises the skin and helps to absorb the excess oil, thus preventing oily skin. Sugar helps to exfoliate the skin while moisturising it. It contains glycolic acid, an alpha hydroxy acid that has antiageing properties. [12] It removes the dead skin cells and helps to get healthy and youthful skin.

    Ingredients

    • 1 tbsp orange juice
    • 1 tsp granulated sugar
    • 1 tsp honey

    Method of use

    • Mix all the ingredients together in a bowl thoroughly.
    • Wet your face.
    • Gently scrub your face with this mixture for a few minutes.
    • Rinse it off later with water.

    4. Papaya

    Papaya has vitamin A and C, that fight free radical damage and help with premature ageing. It has potassium that helps to moisturise the skin. It also contains flavonoids, that facilitate the production of collagen and thus helps to keep the skin firm. [13]

    Ingredients

    • A ripe papaya
    • 5-6 orange pieces

    Method of use

    • Cut the papaya into smaller pieces.
    • Add the pieces to a bowl and mash them well.
    • Squeeze the juice from the orange into the bowl.
    • Mix them thoroughly.
    • Apply the mixture evenly on the face.
    • Leave it on for 15 minutes.
    • Rinse it off later.

    6. Pineapple

    Pineapple contains vitamin C, an antioxidant that helps to fight free radical damage. It is rich in potassium, calcium and malic acid. It also has flavonoids that help to keep the skin firm. [14] It has anti-inflammatory properties and helps to soothe the skin. It also helps to prevent acne and dark spots.

    Olive oil has antioxidant and antibacterial [15] properties that help to keep the skin healthy. Parsley helps to control excess oil. It has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-fungal properties [16] that keep bacteria at bay and the skin healthy.

    Ingredients

    • A few slices of pineapple
    • 2 tsp olive oil
    • 2 tsp parsley

    Method of use

    • Take all the ingredients in a bowl.
    • Crush and mash them to make a paste.
    • Gently scrub the paste on the face for a few minutes, using a scrub pad.
    • Rinse it off with lukewarm water.

    7. Watermelon

    Watermelon contains vitamin A that helps to treat acne. The vitamin C in watermelon helps to fight free radical damage. It also contains vitamins B1 and B6, potassium and magnesium. [17]

    Ingredients

    • 2-3 pieces of watermelon
    • 1 tsp sugar
    • 1 tsp honey

    Method of use

    • Take watermelon in a bowl and mash well.
    • Add sugar and honey into it and mix thoroughly.
    • Gently scrub the mixture on your face for a few minutes, using a scrub pad.
    • Rinse it off later.

    8. Grapes

    Grapes contain vitamin C [18] , an antioxidant that protects the skin from free radicals. This vitamin helps to remove wrinkles and fine lines and makes the skin firm. It rejuvenates the skin and helps control excess oil. Gram flour contains vitamins A, E and C, potassium, iron and magnesium. [19] Gram flour also absorbs excess oil thereby treating acne and blemishes. Milk cream nourishes the skin and makes it soft.

    Ingredients

    • A handful of grapes
    • 1 tsp gram flour
    • 1 tsp milk cream

    Method of use

    • Take the grapes in a bowl and mash them well.
    • Add gram flour and milk cream into the bowl and mix well.
    • Using a scrub pad, gently scrub the mixture on your face for a few minutes.
    • Rinse it off using a facial cleanser.

    9. Apple

    Apple contains vitamin C [20] that helps to protect the skin from free radicals and boost the production of collagen. It contains vitamin A and helps to control excess oil. It also helps to protect the skin from sun damage.

    Ingredients

    • 1 tsp grated apple
    • 1 tsp curd
    • 1 tsp lemon juice

    Method of use

    • Take the grated apple in a bowl.
    • Add curd and lemon juice to the bowl.
    • Mix well to get a smooth paste.
    • Apply the paste evenly on your face.
    • Leave it on for 15 minutes.
    • Rinse it off with cold water.

    10. Mango

    Mango contains vitamins C and A [21] which help to fight free radical damage and control excess oil. They facilitate collagen production and keep the skin firm. The antibacterial effect of mango [22] helps to soothe the skin and keep it bacteria free. Multani mitti is rich in minerals. It removes the dead skin cells and excess oil. It helps to tighten the skin and give it a youthful look.

    Ingredients

    • 2-3 pieces of ripe mango
    • 1 tsp multani mitti
    • 1 tbsp lemon juice

    Method of use

    • Take the mango in a bowl and mash it well.
    • Add the multani mitti and lemon juice to the bowl and mix well.
    • Using a scrub pad, gently scrub the mixture on your face for a few minutes.
    • Rinse it off with a facial cleanser.
    View Article References
    1. [1] Eddy, W. H., & Kellogg, M. (1927). The place of the banana in the diet. American Journal of Public Health, 17(1), 27-35.
    2. [2] Nieman, D. C., Gillitt, N. D., Henson, D. A., Sha, W., Shanely, R. A., Knab, A. M., ... & Jin, F. (2012). Bananas as an energy source during exercise: a metabolomics approach. PLoS One, 7(5), e37479.
    3. [3] Yang, J., Wang, P., Wu, W., Zhao, Y., Idehen, E., & Sang, S. (2016). Steroidal saponins in oat bran. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 64(7), 1549-1556.
    4. [4] Emmons, C. L., Peterson, D. M., & Paul, G. L. (1999). Antioxidant capacity of oat (Avena sativa L.) extracts. 2. In vitro antioxidant activity and contents of phenolic and tocol antioxidants. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 47(12), 4894-4898.
    5. [5] Mandal, M. D., & Mandal, S. (2011). Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, 1(2), 154.
    6. [6] Cruz-Rus, E., Amaya, I., Sanchez-Sevilla, J. F., Botella, M. A., & Valpuesta, V. (2011). Regulation of L-ascorbic acid content in strawberry fruits. Journal of Experimental Botany, 62(12), 4191-4201.
    7. [7] Shu, L. J., Liao, J. Y., Lin, N. C., & Chung, C. L. (2018). Identification of a strawberry NPR-like gene involved in negative regulation of the salicylic acid-mediated defense pathway. PloS one, 13(10), e0205790.
    8. [8] Strålsjö, L. M., Witthöft, C. M., Sjöholm, I. M., & Jägerstad, M. I. (2003). Folate content in strawberries (Fragaria× ananassa): effects of cultivar, ripeness, year of harvest, storage, and commercial processing. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 51(1), 128-133.
    9. [9] Rendon, M. I., Berson, D. S., Cohen, J. L., Roberts, W. E., Starker, I., & Wang, B. (2010). Evidence and considerations in the application of chemical peels in skin disorders and aesthetic resurfacing. The Journal of clinical and aesthetic dermatology, 3(7), 32.
    10. [10] Park, J. H., Lee, M., & Park, E. (2014). Antioxidant activity of orange flesh and peel extracted with various solvents. Preventive nutrition and food science, 19(4), 291.
    11. [11] Lv, X., Zhao, S., Ning, Z., Zeng, H., Shu, Y., Tao, O., ... & Liu, Y. (2015). Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health. Chemistry Central Journal, 9(1), 68.
    12. [12] Moghimipour, E. (2012). Hydroxy acids, the most widely used anti-aging agents. Jundishapur journal of natural pharmaceutical products, 7(1), 9-10.
    13. [13] Sadek, K. M. (2012). Antioxidant and immunostimulant effect of Carica papaya Linn. aqueous extract in acrylamide intoxicated rats. Acta Informatica Medica, 20(3), 180.
    14. [14] Momtazi-borojeni, A. A., Sadeghi-Aliabadi, H., Rabbani, M., Ghannadi, A., & Abdollahi, E. (2017). Cognitive enhancing of pineapple extract and juice in scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice. Research in pharmaceutical sciences, 12(3), 257.
    15. [15] Medina, E., Romero, C., Brenes, M., & de CASTRO, A. N. T. O. N. I. O. (2007). Antimicrobial activity of olive oil, vinegar, and various beverages against foodborne pathogens. Journal of food protection, 70(5), 1194-1199.
    16. [16] Farzaei, M. H., Abbasabadi, Z., Ardekani, M. R. S., Rahimi, R., & Farzaei, F. (2013). Parsley: a review of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and biological activities. Journal of traditional Chinese medicine, 33(6), 815-826.
    17. [17] Naz, A., Butt, M. S., Sultan, M. T., Qayyum, M. M. N., & Niaz, R. S. (2014). Watermelon lycopene and allied health claims. EXCLI journal, 13, 650.
    18. [18] Bracewell, M. F., & Zilva, S. S. (1931). Vitamin C in the orange and the grape fruit. Biochemical Journal, 25(4), 1081.
    19. [19] Wallace, T., Murray, R., & Zelman, K. (2016). The nutritional value and health benefits of chickpeas and hummus. Nutrients, 8(12), 766.
    20. [20] Hadden, R. E. (1938). The Vitamin C Content of Apples. The Ulster medical journal, 7(1), 62.
    21. [21] Lauricella, M., Emanuele, S., Calvaruso, G., Giuliano, M., & D’Anneo, A. (2017). Multifaceted health benefits of mangifera indica L.(Mango): The inestimable value of orchards recently planted in sicilian rural areas. Nutrients, 9(5), 525.
    22. [22] Nadeem, M., Imran, M., & Khalique, A. (2016). Promising features of mango (Mangifera indica L.) kernel oil: a review. Journal of food science and technology, 53(5), 2185-2195.

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