Bad News For Moscow Mule Fans: Drinking Cocktails In Copper Vessels Is Poisonous!

Written By:
copper poisoning

If you are a fan of cocktails, especially the ones that come in aesthetically pleasing copper containers like the Moscow Mule, then here's some bad news for you.

According to the FDA's moral food code, restaurants and bars are prohibited from serving drinks and food in copper containers if their overall pH is less than 6 (characteristic of acidic substances).

This is because the acidic environment starts to leach copper out of such vessels. And exposure to such high amounts of copper can poison you over time.

Moscow Mule: Instagram-Friendly No More

copper poisoning

A Moscow Mule is a classic cocktail made out of vodka, ginger beer and lime juice that is usually served over ice. But lovers of this drink do not prefer it just for its taste.

Because the Moscow Mule is classically served in earthy copper mugs with a sprig of mint and a wedge of lemon, it is perfect for Instagrammers who love sharing pictures of their meals.

Unfortunately, after the latest mandate, Moscow Mule fans can no longer enjoy their favourite drink in these cups. Because the high risk of copper exposure would truly make it the poison of their choice.

Copper: No More And No Less

copper poisoning

Copper is one of the 8 essential trace elements that is needed by our body to function optimally.

It is important for the production of red blood cells, maintenance of blood vessels, nerves and bones, and for the upkeep of our immunity. And you can stock up on your daily recommended dose of it by consuming oysters, whole grains, nuts, beans, potatoes and cocoa.

However, since copper is only required in trace amounts in the body, a little over or under can quickly send you swinging in odd directions. For example, copper deficiency can cause anaemia and osteoporosis.

But what happens when you consume too much of it?

The Concern Over Copper Poisoning

copper poisoning

The daily recommended dose of copper is 1.5-3 mg in adults and less than 2 mg in children. But too much of it can poison you over time.

The symptoms of this include abdominal pain, diarrhoea, vomiting, jaundice, chills, burning sensation of skin, liver and kidney failure, metallic taste in mouth and convulsions. In fact, death due to liver failure is also quite common in such cases.

Given all these gory details, it makes sense why the FDA is so adamant about banning cocktails from being served in copper vessels.

Unfortunately, that means if you love the Moscow Mule, you will probably have to look for something else to share on Instagram this weekend.

Enjoyed reading this article? Hit the heart button to show your love.

You may also like: 6 Weekend Vodka Cocktails

Read more about: poisoning, healthcare, cocktails
Story first published: Monday, August 7, 2017, 17:57 [IST]
Please Wait while comments are loading...
Subscribe Newsletter