Five Most Important Lessons From The Mahabharata

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Many a time in life, we face such situations where we are not able to decide between the right and wrong. In such times, we seek something that can guide us and ensure that the decisions we are taking are right. Righteousness is what should rule our minds at such times.

Therefore, this time, for our readers, we have brought the five most important teachings from the Mahabharata, that will not only increase their knowledge but also guide them in dealing with their problems. Whenever you are confused, you can reach out for these.

lessons from Mahabharata

A Man Is Made By His Belief

This is not a new saying. A number of times, we get to read or hear this. Yet we forget to believe it. It is one of the most important teachings in the Mahabharata. It was all on the basis of belief that Krishna's father could carry baby Krishna to Gokul in a basket amidst the heavy rains and despite being in the captivity of Kansa. It was all because of immense faith in oneself that the Pandavas were successful in defeating the Kouravas. The best teacher of archery, Dronacharya, had denied to accept Arjuna as his student. Still, it was all the power of self-belief that he is today known for his skill in archery.

Think Not Of The Results

It has been mentioned in the holy book that one should neither desire the benefits of his actions and nor long for inaction. Both are extremes and extremes do not beget good results. Focusing on the result and not on the action leads to poor performance, due to distributed concentration and also demotivates a man, if the desired results are not achieved. Even if the results are achieved, the man will be trapped in the demonic quality of pride, which eventually leads to destruction.

Change Is The Only Constant

Nothing in the universe has ever remained same. Krishna himself has said in the Mahabharata that change is the law of nature. Lord Krishna himself had to see drastic changes all throughout his life. Born to some other parents and looked after by others, he had a peaceful life in Gokul and Vrindavan, but had to leave it at the call of the duty. Similarly, he was in love with Radha but got married to Rukmani. Amidst all kinds of changes in his life, he handled himself as well as the situations very well. This change is evident in the life of the Pandavas. While at one point of time, they were the lords of palaces, at others they had to wander in the forests, hiding their true identities, all for the bigger goal of Dharma.

All That Happens Is For A Good Reason

Lord Krishna, soon after birth, had lo leave his real parents, but could therefore escape from the demon Kansa. He had to leave Gokul and his friends, so that the same demon could be killed. Droupadi was attacked by the Kouravas, so that the higher aim of establishing the Dharma could be achieved. Moreover, when Krishna saved Doupadi at the time of her 'Cheer Haran', her faith in Krishna was proved. When Droupadi questioned Krishna that was it her bad karmas in the previous life, as a result of which she was subjected to such a sinful treatment, Krishna said that it is not the victim but the sinner who has a history of bad karmas, as a result of which he has to become a sinner in the present life. Therefore, all that happens is for a good reason, a reason which we may not be able infer at present but which will be proven in the long run.

Dharma Is The Real Duty

After the Mahabharata, when Krishna went to Gandhari to console her, he got cursed by her that his own clan would get destroyed the same way as hers did. She cursed him out of the disappointment that Krishna could have stopped the war if he wanted to. Though it is true, also true is another fact that Krishna did it for the higher aim of establishing Dharma over Adharma. He knew that a hundred sons of Gandhari along with the others had to be sacrificed for the welfare of the future generations, the innocent masses. He told Arjuna to kill his own kins, for the bigger purpose of establishing Dharma. This is the most important lesson and serves as the conclusion of the whole Mahabharata. The real aim of every man is Dharma, righteousness. Mahabharata that change is the law of nature. Lord Krishna himself had to see drastic changes all throughout his life. Born to some other parents and looked after by others, he had a peaceful life in Gokul and Vrindavan, but had to leave it at the call of the duty. Similarly, he was in love with Radha but got married to Rukmani. Amidst all kinds of changes in his life, he handled himself as well as the situations very well. This change is evident in the life of the Pandavas. While at one point of time, they were the lords of palaces, at others they had to wander in the forests, hiding their true identities, all for the bigger goal of Dharma.

All That Happens Is For A Good Reason

Lord Krishna, soon after birth, had lo leave his real parents, but could therefore escape from the demon Kansa. He had to leave Gokul and his friends, so that the same demon could be killed. Droupadi was attacked by the Kouravas, so that the higher aim of establishing the Dharma could be achieved. Moreover, when Krishna saved Doupadi at the time of her 'Cheer Haran', her faith in Krishna was proved. When Droupadi questioned Krishna that was it her bad karmas in the previous life, as a result of which she was subjected to such a sinful treatment, Krishna said that it is not the victim but the sinner who has a history of bad karmas, as a result of which he has to become a sinner in the present life. Therefore, all that happens is for a good reason, a reason which we may not be able infer at present but which will be proven in the long run.

Dharma Is The Real Duty

After the Mahabharata, when Krishna went to Gandhari to console her, he got cursed by her that his own clan would get destroyed the same way as hers did. She cursed him out of the disappointment that Krishna could have stopped the war if he wanted to. Though it is true, also true is another fact that Krishna did it for the higher aim of establishing Dharma over Adharma. He knew that a hundred sons of Gandhari along with the others had to be sacrificed for the welfare of the future generations, the innocent masses. He told Arjuna to kill his own kins, for the bigger purpose of establishing Dharma. This is the most important lesson and serves as the conclusion of the whole Mahabharata. The real aim of every man is Dharma, righteousness.

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    Read more about: mahabharata
    Story first published: Monday, May 14, 2018, 17:46 [IST]
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