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Significance Of Each Colour In Navratri

By Ajanta Sen

Navratri is just around the corner and everyone seems to be very excited for this festival. Navratri means donning a vibrant attire and dancing "Garba" along with family and friends; and hence, women and young girls specially look forward to it throughout the year.

During the 9 days of Navratri, there is a particular colour code for each day. Women dress up in that specific colour and admire the beautiful costumes of each other.

A majority of people know that each day of Navratri has a different importance and value attached to it. Each particular day is devoted to the 9 different forms of Devi Durga.

Each form of Durga represents distinct qualities and is adorned in 9 different colours - in each of the 9 days. Many of us may be unaware of this colour tradition.

Do you know that each colour signifies something during the 9 days of the festival? The article highlights the significance of the nine hues in Navratri, continue reading to know about it.

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1. First Day (Red Colour)

The 1st day of Navratri is called - "Pratipada". On this day, Goddess Durga is revered to as Shailputri, which means "Daughter of the Mountains". This is the very form in which Devi Durga is regarded and worshipped as the companion of Lord Shiva. The red colour for the Pratipada day portrays vigour and action. This energetic colour brings warmth and is a perfect way to prep up for Navratri.

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2. Second Day (Royal Blue)

On the second day(or Dwitiya) of Navratri, Goddess Durga takes the Brahmacharini form. In the form of Brahmacharini, the Goddess grants prosperity and happiness to everyone. The peacock blue is the colour code of this particular day. Blue colour depicts tranquility yet strong energy.

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3. Third Day (Yellow)

On the third day (or Tritiya), Devi Durga is worshipped in the Chandraghanta form. In this form, Durga boasts a half moon on her forehead, which depicts bravery and beauty. Chandraghanta stands for vigour to battle against the demons. Yellow is the colour of the third day, which is a vivacious colour and can pep up everyone's mood.

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4. Fourth Day (Green)

On the fourth day or Chathurthi, Devi Durga takes the Kushmanda form. The colour of this day is green. Kushmanda is believed to be the creator of this universe who laughed and filled this earth with lush green vegetation.

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5. Fifth Day (Grey)

On the fifth day (or Panchami) of Navratri, Devi Durga assumes the "Skand Maata" avatar. On this day, the Goddess appears with baby Karthik (Lord) in her mighty arms. The grey colour represents a vulnerable mother who can become a storm cloud whenever it is needed to safeguard her baby from any kind of danger.

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6. Sixth Day (Orange)

On the 6th day or Shasthi, Devi Durga takes the "Katyayani" form. According to a legend, a famous sage "Kata" had once performed penance because he desired to have Devi Durga in the form of his daughter. Durga was moved by the dedication of Kata and granted his wish. She took birth as the daughter of Kata and wore an orange colour attire, which depicted great courage.

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7. Seventh Day (White)

The 7th day or Saptami of Navratri is dedicated to the "Kalratri" form of Devi Durga. This is supposed to be the most violent form of the Goddess. On Saptami, the Goddess appears in a white colour attire with a lot of rage in her fiery eyes. The white colour portrays prayer and peace, and ensures the devotees that the Goddess will protect them from harm.

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8. Eighth Day (Pink)

Pink is the colour of Ashtami or the 8th day of Navratri. On this day, Devi Durga is believed to destroy all sins. The pink colour depicts hope and a new beginning.

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9. Ninth Day (Light Blue)

On Navami, or the 9th day of Navratri, Devi Durga assumes the "Siddhidatri" form. She dresses up in sky blue colour on this day. The Siddhidatri form is believed to have supernatural curing powers. The light blue colour portrays an admiration towards the nature's beauty.

Read more about: navratri
Story first published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017, 11:30 [IST]
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